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COVID-19 & YOUR DWI ARREST

COVID-19 & Your DWI Arrest - Trichter & LeGrand Law Firm

Arrested For A DWI & No Court Date? Remember, A 15 Day Save Your Drivers License Clock Is Still Clicking! Reading Below, Can Both Extend Your 40 Day Temporary License And May Prevent A Suspension! 

 If you were arrested for a DWI during the COVID-19 Pandemic and you have not received a court date yet, it is important for you to know there is still only a 15-day window to save your license. 

Specifically, you only have 15 days from the date of your arrest to request an Administrative License Revocation (ALR) hearing or you will automatically lose your license after 40 days have passed. 

Here, you need to remember that the “temporary license” the officer gave you is temporary, and only lets you drive for 40 days. 

To try to prevent the automatic suspension, you must timely and correctly request an Administrative License Revocation (ALR) hearing within a 15-day deadline.

Asking for an ALR hearing on the 16th day is too late and you are SOL! 

Incorrectly asking for the hearing can also cause you to be SOL because the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) may take your mistake as a waiver of the request.

The safest way to request an ALR hearing is to let a skilled and experienced DWI Attorney do it for you! 

Do not forfeit your driver’s license by missing the 15-day deadline. Let us help you save your license by scheduling your ALR hearing now.

DWI Attorneys Available 24/7! Get a free consultation.

Call Trichter & LeGrand Law Firm or fill out the form below. 

 

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