GARY TRICHTER SERVES AS MASTER OF CEREMONIES AT ANNUAL JOINT SERVICE ACADEMIES MILITARY BALL

J. Gary Trichter had the honor of serving as Master of Ceremonies at the 29th Annual Joint Service Academies Military Ball on December 26, 2014 at Moody Gardens Convention Center in Galveston, Texas. The event is held to honor the young men and women from the Southeast Texas area who are currently serving as cadets and midshipmen at the five U.S. Service Academies. In addition to approximately 110 Cadets and Midshipmen, the JSAMB is generally attended by over 500 guests, family members, and military dignitaries.

The Ball is hosted, on a rotating basis, by the Army, Navy, and Air Force Academy parents’ associations. This year’s Ball was hosted by the Southeast Texas Air Force Academy Parents’ Association (SETXAFAPA), a non-profit organization that exists solely to provide support to the cadets and midshipmen at the Academies.

The formal dining-out event included a seated dinner and dancing as well as a featured speaker, Lt. Col. Steve Russell, retired.  Col. Russell was instrumental in the capture of Saddam Hussein and is the author of the book WE GOT HIM! A Memoir of the Hunt and Capture of Saddam Hussein.  Col. Russell served in the Oklahoma Senate and was recently elected to represent Oklahoma’s 5th District in the U. S. Congress.

Debra Eno, this year’s Ball Co-Chair said, “The life of a cadet or midshipman at one of our nation’s service academies is much different than the life of most college students. Selection to attend an Academy is prestigious and comes with a full scholarship, but acceptance of the appointment is not without sacrifice.  The Academy experience is a four-year immersion experience designed to produce a leader of character; the pressures on these young men and women are enormous. Being active duty, they must fulfill military obligations and stay in top physical shape while carrying a heavy academic load. While other college students enjoy summer break, Cadets and Midshipmen undergo summer military training and professional development. In the little discretionary time they have, they frequently take optional training, or perform volunteer service.”